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The Jacket from Dachau: Maps and Infographics

Peresecki Family Tree

The Peresecki Family tree, including Ben, his mother Chiena, his father Mosche, and his brother Levi-Ichak

All graphics were originally produced by the curatorial team; they contain images and research (with permissions granted) ​from USHMM, Yad Veshem, Jewish Virtual Library, The Simon Wiesenthal Center, the Anti-Defamation League, and the Encyclopedia of the Holocaust (1990​; I. Gutman, ed.). Information and data in the infographics were fact-checked by Dr. Geoffrey Megargee of the USHMM. For more information, contact Dr. Cary Lane.

Map of World War Two Era Europe

One large maps of Europe with three smaller, inlay maps showing how the borders between countries changed before the war, during the height of Nazi expansion, and after the war.

All graphics were originally produced by the curatorial team; they contain images and research (with permissions granted) ​from USHMM, Yad Veshem, Jewish Virtual Library, The Simon Wiesenthal Center, the Anti-Defamation League, and the Encyclopedia of the Holocaust (1990​; I. Gutman, ed.). Information and data in the infographics were fact-checked by Dr. Geoffrey Megargee of the USHMM. For more information, contact Dr. Cary Lane.

Percentage of Jews Killed During the Holocaust

A graph demonstrating the percentage of the Jewish population killed during the Holocaust by country. Approximately 87.5 percent of Lithuanian Jews were killed, ranking it the third highest, following Poland and Greece.

All graphics were originally produced by the curatorial team; they contain images and research (with permissions granted) ​from USHMM, Yad Veshem, Jewish Virtual Library, The Simon Wiesenthal Center, the Anti-Defamation League, and the Encyclopedia of the Holocaust (1990​; I. Gutman, ed.). Information and data in the infographics were fact-checked by Dr. Geoffrey Megargee of the USHMM. For more information, contact Dr. Cary Lane.

Concentration Camp Jackets

A graphic showing the different types of uniforms and means of identifying unique groups within the camps. Different camps used stripes of varying thickness while different colored triangles were used to identify prisoners.

All graphics were originally produced by the curatorial team; they contain images and research (with permissions granted) ​from USHMM, Yad Veshem, Jewish Virtual Library, The Simon Wiesenthal Center, the Anti-Defamation League, and the Encyclopedia of the Holocaust (1990​; I. Gutman, ed.). Information and data in the infographics were fact-checked by Dr. Geoffrey Megargee of the USHMM. For more information, contact Dr. Cary Lane.